Battle of Baugé

Part of the Hundred Years’ War

Battle of Baugé

Date
22 March 1421

Location
Baugé, France

Result
Franco-Scottish victory

Belligerents

Kingdom of France
Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of England

Commanders and leaders

John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan,
Gilbert de Lafayette, Marshal of France
Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence †
Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter
John Beaufort, Duke of Somerset

Strength

5,000
4,000
Only 1,500 deployed

Casualties and losses

light
1,000 dead, 500 captured

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e

Hundred Years’ War

Edwardian phase
War of the Breton Succession
War of the Two Peters
Castilian Civil War
Caroline phase
Despenser’s Crusade
1383–85 Crisis
Lancastrian phase
Armagnac–Burgundian conflict

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Hundred Years’ War
Lancastrian phase (1415–53)

Harfleur
Agincourt
Valmont
Rouen
2nd La Rochelle
Baugé
Meaux
Cravant
La Brossinière
Verneuil
St. James
Orléans
Herrings
Loire
Jargeau
Meung-sur-Loire
Beaugency
Patay
Reims
Paris
La Charité
Compiègne
Gerberoy
Formigny
Castillon

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Anglo-Scottish Wars

Duns
Otterburn
English invasion of Scotland (1400)
Nesbit Moor (1402)
Homildon Hill
Yeavering
Piperdean
Sark
Roxburgh
Berwick (1482)
Lochmaben Fair
Flodden Field
Haddon Rig
Solway Moss
Edinburgh
Ancrum Moor
Pinkie Cleugh
Inchkeith
Haddington
Broughty Castle
Redeswire

The Battle of Baugé, fought between the English and a Franco-Scots army on 22 March 1421 at Baugé, France, east of Angers, was a major defeat for the English in the Hundred Years’ War. The English army was led by the king’s brother Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, while the Franco-Scots were led by both John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan, and Gilbert de Lafayette, the Marshal of France. English strength was 4,000 men, although only 1,500 deployed, against 5,000 French and Scots.

Contents

1 Background
2 Battle
3 Aftermath
4 Notable casualties and captives
5 See also
6 Notes
7 References

Background[edit]
Henry V, with the intention of resuming the war, sailed from England to France with a force of about 10,500. He then pursued a highly successful military campaign, including the decisive victory at the Battle of Agincourt, and regained from the French crown much of England’s previously held lands in France.[1][2]
The Scots had been in an alliance with France since 1295.[3] In 1419 the situation in France was desperate. Normandy was lost to the E
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